Hilda Canter-Lund competition 2016 second prize winner

Petr_Znachor_compressed

A short while ago I wrote about Tiffany Stephens winning entry for the 2016 Hilda Canter-Lund prize.   Following that, the Council of the British Phycological Society agreed that a second prize, of equal value, would also be awarded, starting this year, which means that I am very pleased to announce that Petr Znachor’s image of summer phytoplankton from the Řìmov Rservoir in the Czech Republic will also be honoured by the society.

The rationale for the decision is that Hilda Canter-Lund was primarily a photographer of the microscopic world, yet five of the seven winners of the competition to date have either been of images of macroalgae or (in the case of the 2009 winner) a seascape in which an algal bloom is prominent.  I suspect that there are a number of reasons for this, but the greater technical challenges facing anyone who wishes to photograph the microscopic world plays a key role.  The first prize is awarded based on a vote by members of the BPS Council; the second prize, by contrast, will be awarded at the judge’s discretion, but for an image in a contrasting style.   This year, as Tiffany Stephens won with an image of the macroalga Durvillaea antarctica, the award goes to Petr Znachor but there is no reason why, in future years, a microalgal image may get the most votes, in which case a macroalgal image will get the other prize.

Petr’s image shows summer phytoplankton in the eutrophic Řìmov Rservoir dominated by the desmids Cosmarium and Staurastrum. It was taken during examination of a sample that was collected as part of a long-term monitoring program and concentrated with 20 µm plankton net.  He used an Olympus BX51 microscope with Nomarski contrast lighting and an Olympus DP70 camera.

znachy

Petr Znachor received his Ph.D. from the University of South Bohemia (Czech Republic) in 2003. He is currently a research associate at the Institute of Hydrobiology where his research focuses on phytoplankton ecology and, in particular, the ecology of reservoirs and analyses of long-term time series of data. Ever since he first looked through a microscope he was astonished by the myriad beautiful shapes and colours of phytoplankton existing in a single drop of water. He hopes that his pictures raise awareness of the importance of these tiny organisms.

As do we.

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