Hilda Canter-Lund competition 2017 winners

The winner of the 2017 Hilda Canter-Lund photography competition is Chris Carter for his image of the desmid Pleurotaenium coronatum var. robustum.   This is the second time that Chris has won the competition and his fifth time on the shortlist, confirming an already impressive reputation as a photographer of the algal world.   This particular image is of a specimen that was collected whilst on holiday in Newfoundland, Canada, and preserved in formalin.  This led to the loss of chloroplast colour but which, in turn, made the pore field at the end of the cell more obvious.

The technical skill behind this image is not immediately obvious unless you know the genus Pleuotaenium typically consists of cylindrical cells several times longer than wide.  This particular specimen is 45 micrometres (about 1/20th of a millimetre) in diameter but is almost half a millimetre long.  The challenge was increased because the 100x magnification oil-immersion objective which he used has a very shallow depth of field.  Chris had to suspend the cell in dilute jelly in a cavity tank not much deeper than its length.  Having done this, he agitated the cell with a length of fine wire and once it was no longer horizontal he could manipulate it by gently sliding the coverslip relative to the cell.  The photograph which won the competition is one of many attempts and, even so, Chris commented that the cell is probably a degree or so away from vertical even here but, he went on: “I thought the lighting was actually quite attractive with the bronze hue of the preserved wall contrasting with a blue tinge from the light source; even the very slight tilt perhaps suggests a monster (or a something) rising out of the deep.”

Pleurotaenium coronatum var. robustum.  The top left image is an apical view, showing the pores and the radial ring of tubercules (knobbly projections).  The lower image shows the cell in plane view.   All images by Chris Carter.

Chris Carter, Hilda Canter-Lund prize winner, 2013 and 2017.

The second prize this year was also awarded to a former winner.  Tiff Stephens won the competition last year with her photograph of Durvillaea antarctica in the intertidal zone of the sub-Antarctic Snares Islands.  This year, it was her photograph of the red alga Bonnemaisonia clavata that caught the judge’s eye.   This is a very different style of photograph to her winning entry from last year, taken using an Olympus DP20 camera on a dissecting microscope.   The row of spheres along the secondary axis (“stem”) contain female reproductive cells and the prominent branchlet in the centre right is 1.5 mm long.

“Cystocarp Central”: Tiffany Stephen’s winning entry for the 2017 Hilda Canter-Lund photography competition. 

Though the style of the picture is very different to last year’s entry, it shares with that image an encapsulation of the “decisive moment” (see “How to win the Hilda Canter-Lund competition”). Tiff comments that many of her images are “opportunistically taken while sprinting around doing fieldwork”.  In this particular case, she was on a fun dive outside of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada), collecting seaweeds to look at later, with a view to possibly making herbarium pressings.   She saw dense lumps of Bonnemaisonia clavata, a species with which she was not familiar, at depths between 5 and 10 metres on semi-exposed reefs and collected some to have a closer look later.

The two images represent the two extremes of photographing the microscopic world: Chris applied a great deal of technical skill and ingenuity to create an aesthetically-pleasing image from difficult subject matter whilst Tiff saw an elegant composition drift into view as she scanned around recently-collected field material.  Both photographers have an “eye” for a good composition and the patience and technical skill needed to capture a fine image when the occasion final presented itself.   They are also – and this is important – keen field scientists, grabbing samples out of sheer curiosity and then marvelling as new and fantastical worlds open up to them under the microscope.  Both worthy winners and, with John Huisman (winner in 2014, shortlisted five times), now form algal photography’s “superleague”: the people to beat in 2018!

Tiff Stephens surrounded by Macrocystis in Alaska earlier this year.  Follow Tiff on Twitter at @tiffanybot to see more examples of her photography.

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