Rolling stones gather no moss …

Back in early July I mused on how rivers changed over time (see “Where’s the Wear’s weir?”) and reflected on how this shapes our expectations about the plants and animals that we find.  In that post, I compared a view of the River Tees today with the same view as captured by J.R.W Turner at the end of the 18th century.   The photograph above is taken about 40 kilometres further upstream from Egglestone Abbey and shows the River Tees as it tumbles along in a narrow valley between Falcon Clints and Cronkley Scar.   I’ve written about this stretch of river before (see “The intricate ecology of green slime” and “More from Upper Teesdale”) and it is an idyllic stretch.   It all looks, to the uninitiated, very natural, almost untouched by the hand of man.

However, a couple of kilometres beyond this point we turn a corner and are confronted by a high waterfall, Cauldron Snout, formed where the river cascades over the hard Whin Sill.   Scrambling up the blocky dolerite is not difficult so long as you have a head for heights but, on reaching the top, a wall of concrete comes into view.  This is the dam of Cow Green Reservoir, constructed between 1967 and 1971 and highly controversial at the time.  The purpose of the reservoir was to regulate the flow in the River Tees, in particular ensuring that there was sufficient flow in the summer to ensure a steady supply for the industries of Teeside (most of which have, subsequently, closed).  My first visit to Cauldron Snout was in the early 1980s on a Northern Naturalist Union field excursion led by David Bellamy.  As we scrambled down Cauldron Snout, Tom Dunn, an elderly stalwart of the NNU, told me how much more impressive Cauldron Snout had been before the dam was closed.

Now look back at the picture at the top of this post.   The dark patches on the tops of the boulders emerging from the water are growths of the moss Schistidium rivulare, which thrives on the tops of stable boulders that are occasionally submerged.    The old adage “a rolling stone gathers no moss” is, actually, true, leaving me wondering how much less of this moss an walker beside this river in the mid-1960s might have seen.   How many more powerful surges of storm-fuelled water would have there been to overturn the larger boulders on which Schistidium rivulare depends?   Bear in mind, too, that two major tributaries, the Rivers Balder and Lune, also have flow regimes modified by reservoirs and the potential for subtle alteration of the view that Turner saw at Egglestone increases.   I wrote recently about how differences in hydrological regime can affect the types and quantities of algae that are found (see “A tale of two diatoms …”).   I may have stood at exactly the same place where Turner had sat when he drew the scene at Egglestone, but I was looking at a very different river.

The dam of Cow Green Reservoir looming above the top of Cauldron Snout in Upper Teesdale National Nature Reserve, Co. Durham, July 2017.  The picture at the top of this post shows the Tees a couple of kilometres downstream from Cauldron Snout.

Trevor Crisp from the Freshwater Biological Association showed that the consequences of Cow Green Reservoir on the River Tees extend beyond alterations to the flow.  Impounding a huge quantity of water in one of the coolest parts of the country also affects the temperature of the river, due to water’s high specific heat capacity.  This means that there is not just a narrower range of flows, but also a narrower range of temperature recorded.   The difference between coolest and warmest temperatures in the Tees below Cow Green dropped by 1 – 2 °C, which may not seem a lot, but one consequence is to delay the warming of the river water in Spring by about a month, which delays the development of young trout.  However, Crisp and colleagues went on to show that any reduction in growth rate due to lower temperatures was actually offset by other side-effects of the dam (such as a less harsh flow regime) to result in an increase in the total density of fish downstream.   Others have shown significant shifts in the types of invertebrate that he found in the Tees below Cow Green, with a decrease in taxa that are adapted to a harsh hydrological regime, as might be expected.   Maize Beck, a tributary which joins just below Cauldron Snout, and which has a natural flow regime, shows many fewer changes.

One conclusion that we can draw from all this is that healthy ecosystems such as the upper Tees are fairly resilient and can generally adapt to a certain amount of change, as Trevor Crisp’s work on the fish shows us. The big caveat on this is that the upper Tees is relatively unusual in having no natural salmon populations, as the waterfall at High Force presents a natural obstacle to migration.  Had this not been present, then all potential spawning grounds upstream of the reservoir would have been lost.   A second caveat is that there is still a lot that we do not know.   The studies of the river that followed the closure of the dam focussed on lists of the animal and plant species found; a modern ecologist might have put more effort into understanding the consequences for ecological processes, the “verbs” in ecosystems, rather than in the “nouns”.  Who knows how different energy pathways are now, compared to the days before regulation, and what the long-term consequences of such changes might be?  Schistidium rivulare is a good example of the limitations of our knowledge: its presence offers insights into the hydrology of the river, but we know relatively little about the roles that these semi-aquatic mosses play in the river ecosystem.   Knowing that there is much that we do not know should, at least, keep us humble as we struggle to find the balance between preserving natural landscapes and their sustainable use in the future.

Note

Twenty years ago, I would have recognised Schistidium rivulare, if not in the field, then at least after a quick check under the microscope.  Now, however, my moss identification skills are rusty and I had to turn to Pauline Lang to get this moss named.   I mentioned in “The Stresses of Summertime …” how the ecologist’s niche becomes the office not the field.  One danger is that we remain familiar with names (as I am with S. rivulare and other aquatic mosses) but, through lack of practice, lose the craft that connects those names to the living organisms.

References

Armitage, P.D. (2006).   Long-term faunal changes in a regulated and an unregulated stream – Cow Green thirty years on.  River Research and Applications 22: 957-966.

Crisp, D.T. (1973).  Some physical and chemical effects of the Cow Green (upper Teesdale) impoundment.  Freshwater Biology 7: 109-120.

Crisp, D.T., Mann, R.H.K. & Cubby, P.R. (1983).  Effects of regulation on the River Tees upon fish populations below Cow Green Reservoir.  Journal of Applied Ecology 20: 371-386.

Lang, P.D. & Murphy, K.J. (2012).  Environmental drivers, life strategies and bioindicator capacity of bryophyte communities in high-latitude headwater streams.  Hydrobiologia 612: 1-17.

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