Burnhope Burn’s beautiful biofilms …

I have continued the series of studies that I started in “In search of the source of the Wear” with a three-dimensional diorama of the biofilm that I found at the mouth of Burnhope Burn, and can now compare it with the corresponding study from Wolsingham (see “The curious life of biofilms”).   The two big differences are the greater number of green filaments at Burnhope and the large numbers of cells of Navicula lanceolata at Wolsingham.   I suspect the two are linked: the Wolsingham biofilm was a mix of diatoms and organic particulate matter along with associated bacteria whilst the Burnhope biofilm was green algae and organic matter with diatoms in a subordinate role.  I speculated, in my earlier post, that Burnhope Burn’s location below a reservoir may have altered the hydrology of the stream such that green algae were favoured.   I wonder, too, if the presence of green algae then subtly shifts the composition of the biofilm matrix such that dense aggregations of Navicula lanceolata are not able to develop in the way that they could at Wolsingham.

There is something about the ecology of a few Navicula species that leads to the development of these aggregations (see “The ecology of cold days” for more about freshwaters, whilst “An excuse for a crab sandwich, really” and “A typical Geordie alga …” describes similar phenomena in brackish habitats).   Conversely, Nitzschia dissipata, which was the most abundant diatom at Burnhope Burn, never seems to form these dense monocultures.   Nitzschia dissipata was also much less common in the biofilm from Killhope Burn, just a few metres away from where I collected the Burnhope sample and where filamentous green algae are scarce.  wonder if this, too, is more than a coincidence and that N. dissipata is actually adapted to living within matrices formed by filamentous algae rather than on top of matrices dominated by diatoms and organic particulates?

I have seen a few other motile diatoms – Denticula tenuis is one – that seem to be more abundant in the presence of filamentous algae.   There may also be species that thrive when the matrix is composed largely of inorganic particles, as well as other species (Navicula angusta and N. notha are two that spring to mind) that may be naturally “understory” species that are never especially abundant in biofilms.   All this is pure speculation, but it is worth remembering that most of the insights into diatom ecology come from studies on cleaned valves which removes all traces of non-diatom algae, and also that the prevailing dogma of diatom sensitivity to their chemical environment is such that non-chemical factors are largely overlooked in academic studies.   No evidence, in this case, may just mean that no-one has asked the right questions.

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