Life out of water …

Last time I wrote, I mentioned that those diatom genera that did not have to be permanently submerged in order to thrive (so-called “aerophilous diatoms”) often appeared together in samples.   Having seen some Luticola muticaearly in my analysis of the sample from Castle Eden Burn, it was no surprise to find Diadesmisand Simonsenialater in the same analysis.   If anything, the biggest surprise was that I did not also find Hantzschia amphioxys, another habitué of the damp fringes of diatom society.

A quick analysis of my database puts these thoughts into context.   There are 6500 samples in my database, so we can see, from the total number of records of each of the aerophilous genera that these are relatively scarce in the samples I encounter.  That is largely because my sampling approaches are biased against the habitats where these thrive (more about this below).   Aerophilous diatoms are more common than you might think; it is scientists with a yearning to learn more about them that is in short supply.

Hantzschiaand Simonseniaare both less frequent and less abundant than the other two genera, never occurring in numbers exceeding ten per cent of the total but, when they form more than one per cent of the total, there is a very high chance that you will also find other aerophilous taxa in the sample.   Humidophilaand Luticolaare sometimes found in higher numbers, and when this is the case, then the proportion of other aerophilous taxa is also often high: 75 per cent of samples where Humidophilais abundant, for example, have at least one other aerophilous taxon present at one per cent or more.

Frequency of other aerophilous genera in samples with Hantzschia, Humidophila, Luticolaand Simonsenia.    Each genus is represented by two rows: records where it formed 10 per cent or more of the total number of valves and records where it formed more than one per cent.   Similarly, records for other aerophilous genera are also stratified into those where they comprise more than 10 per cent of the total and those where they comprise more than one per cent.  

Genus number of records   other aerophilous genera
>10% >1%
Hantzschia 147 >10% n/a n/a
>1% 0.50 0.70
Humidophila 248 >10% 0.25 0.75
>1% 0.09 0.29
Luticola 630 >10% 0.09 0.35
>1% 0.05 0.16
Simonsenia 61 >10% n/a n/a
>1% 0.50 1.00

Over the years, I have come to use this information informally as a way of knowing whether the results of an analysis are likely to be giving me useful insights into ecological condition.   Many of the samples I analyse are collected by other people and sent to me.   These samplers should have been working to protocols that ensure that they check that the stones they choose were fully submerged for some time prior to their visit.  However, the person collecting the sample may have to make a judgement about river and lake level fluctuations in the period before their visit.  Finding lots of cells of aerophilous taxa in a sample is a good hint that something is awry.

The German method for ecological status assessment actually uses the proportion of aerophilous taxa as a check on the reliability of an assessment.    I suspect that they are not the only ones, but They have a list of 46 species that they regard as aerophilous taxa, and use a threshold of five per cent in a sample as a threshold.   The genera I’ve discussed all feature prominently, along with representatives of 19 other genera. Most of these are represented by only one or two species, although there are seven species of Nitzschia, five of Pinnulariaand six of Stauroneis.   I suspect that some species on this list are more tolerant of desiccation than others. We do not know enough of the physiological mechanisms behind this tolerance but it would seem that a few genera (Hantzschia, Humidophila, Luticiola) have definitely got this hard-wired into their genotypes, whilst other genera have members which are mostly aquatic in their habit but with a few exceptions able to survive out of water for some time.   I, personally, would trust the five per cent threshold if it was restricted to the hardcore aerophilous genera, with other taxa on the list providing supporting evidence. I would also add the proviso that there should be more than one aerophilous taxon contributing to that five per cent.  I would be happier, too, if there were a few experimental studies behind these lists and thresholds but, as ever with the world of diatoms, taxonomists are several steps ahead of the physiologists and so we are heavily dependent on anecdotal information when interpreting results.

List of taxa regarded as aerophilous in the German system for assessing ecological status in rivers. 

Name Authority
Achnanthes coarctata (Brébisson) Grunow in Cleve & Grunow 1880
Chamaepinnularia parsura (Hustedt) C.E.Wetzel & Ector in Wetzel et al. 2013
Cosmioneis incognita (Krasske) Lange-Bertalot in Werum & Lange-Bertalot 2004
Denticula creticola (Østrup) Lange-Bertalot & Krammer 1993
Diploneis minuta Petersen 1928
Eolimna subadnata  (Hustedt) G. Moser, Lange-Bertalot & Metzeltin 1998
Fallacia egregia (Hustedt) D.G. Mann 1990
Fallacia insociabilis (Krasske) D.G. Mann 1990
Fistulifera pelliculosa (Brébisson ex Kützing) Lange-Bertalot 1997
Halamphora montana (Krasske) Levkov 2009
Halamphora normanii (Rabenhorst) Levkov 2009
Hantzschia abundans Lange-Bertalot 1993
Hantzschia amphioxys (Ehrenberg) Grunow 1880
Hantzschia elongata (Hantzsch) Grunow 1877
Hantzschia graciosa Lange-Bertalot 1993
Hantzschia subrupestris Lange-Bertalot 1993
Hantzschia vivacior Lange-Bertalot 1993
Humidophila aerophila (Krasske) Lowe, Kociolek, Johansen, Van de Vijver, Lange-Bertalot & Kopalová, 2014
Humidophila brekkaensis (J.B.Petersen) D. Lowe, Kociolek, Johansen, Van de Vijver, Lange-Bertalot & Kopalová, 2014
Humidophila contenta (Grunow) Lowe, Kociolek, Johansen, Van de Vijver, Lange-Bertalot & Kopalová, 2014
Humidophila perpusilla (Grunow) Lowe, Kociolek, Johansen, Van de Vijver, Lange-Bertalot & Kopalová, 2014
Luticola cohnii (Hilse) D.G. Mann 1990
Luticola dismutica (Hustedt) D.G.Mann1990
Luticola mutica (Kützing) D.G. Mann 1990
Luticola nivalis (Ehrenberg) D.G. Mann 1990
Luticola nivaloides (W.Bock) J.Y.Li & Y.Z.Qi 2018
Luticola paramutica (W. Bock) D.G. Mann 1990
Luticola pseudonivalis (W.Bock) Levkov, Metzeltin & A.Pavlov 2013
Luticola saxophila (W.Bock ex Hustedt) D.G.Mann 1990
Mayamaea nolensoides (W. Bock) Lange-Bertalot 2001
Melosira dickiei (Thwaites) Kützing 1849
Muelleria gibbula (Cleve) Spaulding & Stoermer 1997
Neidium minutissimum Krasske 1932
Nitzschia aerophila Hustedt 1942
Nitzschia bacillarieformis Hustedt 1922
Nitzschia disputata J.R. Carater 1971
Nitzschia harderi Husedt 1949
Nitzschia modesta Hustedt 1950
Nitzschia terrestris (J.B. Petersen) Hustedt 1934
Nitzschia valdestriata Aleem & Hustedt 1951
Orthoseira dendroteres (Ehrenberg) Genkal & Kulikovskiy in Kulikovskiy et al. 2010
Orthoseira roseana (Rabenhorst) Pfitzer 1871
Pinnularia borealis Ehrenberg 1843
Pinnularia frauenbergiana E. Reichardt 1985
Pinnularia krookii (Grunow) Hustedt 1942
Pinnularia largerstedtii (Cleve) Cleve-Euler 1934
Pinnularia obscura Krasske 1932
Simonsenia delognei (Grunow) Lange-Bertalot 1979
Stauroneis agrestis J.B. Petersen 1915
Stauroneis borrichii (J.B.Petersen) J.W.G.Lund 1946
Stauroneis gracillima Hustedt 1943
Stauroneis lundii Hustedt 1959
Stauroneis muriella J.W.G. Lund 1946
Stauroneis obtusa Lagerstedt 1873
Surrirella terricola Lange-Bertalot & Alles 1996
Tryblionella debilis Arnott ex O’Meara 1873

Reference

Schaumburg, J., Schranz, C., Steizer, D., Hofmann, G., Gutowski, A. & Forester, J. (2006).  Instruction protocol for the ecological assessment of running waters for implementation of the EC Water Framework Directive: macrophytes and phytobenthos.  Bavarian Environment Agency

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