More algae from Shetland lochs …

Lamba_Water_May19

I’m taking you back in the Shetland Islands for this post, and onto the remote moorlands of northern Mainland.   When I visited this particular loch in 2016, I noticed a lot of slippery filaments of Batrachospermum attached to the sides of the cobbles in the littoral zone (see “Lucky heather …”).   This time around, I explored further around the edge of the loch and, in the south-west corner noticed prolific growths of algae in the shallow peaty water.  Closer inspection showed that these, too, were the red alga Batrachospermum and, though they were not fertile, Dave John suggests that they are likely to be B. turfosum Bory.

Batrachospermum_Lamba_Water_May19

Tufts of Batrachospermum turfosumin the littoral zone of Lamba Water, north Mainland, Shetland Islands, May 2019.   The picture frame is about 15 centimetres across. 

If you have a hand lens you can just about make out a bead-like structure when observing Batrachospermum in the field; however this becomes much clearer with higher magnification.   I think it looks like a bottle-brush when seen under the microscope at low magnification, with whorls of side-branches arising from the central filament.  At higher magnification, these filaments can be seen to have a bead-like structure, with cell size gradually reducing with distance from the centre.

What you cannot do in the field is separate Batrachospermumfrom the closely-related genus Sheathia(see “News about Batrachospermum… hot off the press”).   I usually tell people that, for a general overview of the condition of a stream or lake (for example, as part of the UK macrophyte survey technique), then simply recognising that you have “Batrachospermum” (meaning Batrachospermum or Sheathia) should be enough.   In my experience, the presence of Batrachospermumis usually a good indication that the water body is in a healthy condition.  However, I have been told that Batrachospermumis often found growing prolifically in very enriched conditions in southern chalk streams, which would challenge this assumption.   This may be because the species that are found in southern chalk streams are different to those that I encounter in my more usual haunts in northern England and Scotland.  But it is also possible that the factors I described in “The exception that proves the rule …” pertain in those cases too.

Batrachospermum_turfosum_Lamba_Water

Filaments of Batrachospermum turfosum from Lamba Water, north Mainland, Shetland Islands, May 2019.   The upper photograph shows a low magnification view of a filament (about 350 micrometres, or 0.35 millimetres, wide) whilst the lower image shows a whorl of side branches arising from the main stem.  Scale bar: 20 micrometres (= 1/50thof a millimetre).  

We often run into this dilemma with filamentous freshwater algae: it is reasonably straightforward to identify the genus but we need reproductive organs to determine the species.  As they seem to survive quite happily in the vegetative state our understanding of the ecology of individual species (rather than the genus as a whole) is scant so it is hard to tell whether there is value in that missing information or not.   In a few cases – this is one – better taxonomic understanding has revealed that we may not even be dealing with a single genus but the lists used for applied ecological surveys still persist with the old concepts.

This creates a toxic spiral of consequences: it is hard to split into species so most people don’t bother. Because we don’t bother, our interpretations are based on generalisations drawn from the behaviour of the genus.  This means we don’t generate the data needed to demonstrate the value (or otherwise) of the effort required to go from genus- to species-level identifications.   So we carry on lumping all records to genus (or, in this case, a pair of genera) and accept a few records that our out of line with our expectations as “noise”.  The situation is probably worse in the UK than in many places because there are very few people in universities specialising in these organisms and, as a result, no-one is producing the data that might break us out of this spiral.

We found Batrachospermum turfosum in a few other locations during our visit, but nowhere, even in nearby lochs, was it in such quantity as we saw in Lamba Water.   Chance might play a part in determining its distribution on a local scale but that ought to be the explanation of last resort rather than the go-to answer when we are worryingly short of hard evidence.

 

 

2 thoughts on “More algae from Shetland lochs …

  1. Batrachospermum sp sensu lato also grows in a small spring in Havant near St Faith’s Church (Hampshire). The town name derives from the Latin funta, meaning spring or fountain. I am told that this was the basis for the prosperity of Havant in mediaeval times as the pure water from the chalky South Downs was used in curing sheepskin for vellum parchment. Hence, the local Wetherspoons is called the Parchment Makers, my dictionary defines vellum as using calfskin.
    It also claimed that the original Magna Carta was written on Havant vellum.

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