Hilda Canter-Lund shortlist 2019

We’ve just announced the shortlist for the 2019 Hilda Canter-Lund but, unfortunately, the British Phycological Society’s webmaster is presently on a research cruise and has limited bandwidth so we haven’t been able to put them onto the BPS website yet.   Meanwhile, here is a sneak preview of what to expect when the shortlist finally does appear.  We had over fifty submissions this year, and it was a hard job to select the six images that make up the shortlist.  We always try to get a balance between different genres of images and, this year, we have two images of microalgae, two of marine macroalgae and two that sit in the middle ground – macroscopic images of microscopic organisms, if that makes sense.  If not, read on and all will become clear.

The first of the microscopic images is Cyanobacterial Entanglement, an almost abstract image of Cyanobacteria filaments taken by Forrest Leffler from the University of Florida. Alongside this we have Majestic Micrasterias, an image of the desmid Micrasterias furcata taken by William Murray from a sample from a lake in Delaware.   Whereas Forrest Leffler exploited abstract qualities in his image, William Murray achieves a sufficiently high level of detail that would not look out of place in an identification guide.   His image is very much in the tradition of Hilda Canter-Lund, which is one of the reasons why the judges recommended its inclusion on the shortlist.

HCL_2019_Leffler_Murray

Forrest Leffler’s Cyanobacterial Entanglement and William Murray’s Majestic Micrasterias.

A similar abstract versus representation tension is apparent in the two images of macroalgae on the shortlist.   Serial shortlist contender (and 2014 winner) John Huisman offers us a beautiful image of the red alga Martensia denticulata, photographed at Cape Perron, Western Australia, whilst Zoe Loffler from James Cook University in Queensland takes us to the other side of the continent to enjoy a riot of colour in her image of seaweed taken during a family camping trip.

HCL_2019_Huisman_Loffler

John Huisman’s The next generation: Martensia denticulata, with cystocarpsand Zoe Loffler’s Symphony of Seaweed.

The final two images sit at the borderline between the macroscopic and microscopic worlds.  Damian Sirjacobs’ from the University of Liège in Belgium submitted an untitled image showing a bluish haze created by the diatom Haslea growing over macroalgae in shallow water in Calvi Bay, Corsica, whilst Wright State University’s Leon Kantona’s Pedestal of Productivity shows filaments of the Cyanobacteria Phormidiumand Oscillatoria amidst a yellow-brown mass of diatoms in an aquarium towards the end of a long-term photophysiology experiment.   You can also see oxygen bubbles surrounding the filaments due to the high rates of photosynthesis.

HCL_2019_Sirjacobs_Kantona

Damian Sirjacobs untitled view of the diatom Haslea growing amidst other algae, and Leon Katona’s Pedestal of Productivity.

The thumbnails in this post don’t really show the images at their very best; however, we hope to get them mounted on the BPS website within a few days, so that you can enjoy them all at higher resolution.  Meanwhile, the BPS Council are voting to decide the winners and I will be writing more about these just as soon as a decision has been reached.

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