The way things were …

Writing the previous post led me to contemplate how much things had changed over the time that I have been working in this field.  Back in the early 1990s when I first set out to look at the response of diatoms to nutrients in streams, few in the National Rivers Authority (NRA, predecessor to the Environment Agency) regarded phosphorus as a serious pollutant in rivers, and most biologists thought about ecological quality solely in terms of organic pollution and invertebrates.   In order to investigate the effect of nutrients, I wanted to visit sites where organic pollution was not a problem.

I was helped in this task by the work done by biologists at the then Institute for Freshwater Ecology (now Centre for Ecology and Hydrology) who had just developed the early versions of RIVPACS (“River Invertebrate Prediction and Classification System”) which established the principle of expressing ecological quality as the observed quality / expected quality.  This, in turn, required an ability to predict the “expected” condition for any stream.   The work that had developed these equations started from a dataset of invertebrate and environmental data collected from a wide range of “unpolluted” running water sites which, in those far off days, was compiled by asking biologists working for the Regional Water Authorities (predecessors to the NRA) for their recommendations of sites that were of “good” or “fairly good” quality.  Nowadays, screening sites to be used for calibrating ecological methods is a much more rigorous procedure but this was the first tentative step on a long journey and “expert judgement” was as good a place to start as any.

The paper that emerged from this exercise (see reference below) analysed data from these “unpolluted” sites and classified them into eight groups.  Each of these groups consisted of sites that shared similar invertebrate assemblages which reflected similarities in the habitat, from upland, fast flowing becks to deep, wide slow-flowing rivers in the lowlands.  The authors included a useful table that listed the physical and chemical characteristics of each of these groups and I noticed that the phosphorus concentrations reported for these spanned a very wide range.   This meant that I could use these as the basis for putting together a sampling program that spanned a long gradient of nutrient pressure without the complications of organic pollution.   The outcome of that work was the first of the two papers referenced in my previous post.

Time has moved on and I thought it would be interesting to revisit these “unpolluted” sites to see how they would be classified using the UK’s current standards for phosphorus.  This highlights a striking difference between the prevailing idea of “unpolluted” in the early 1980s and the present day, as all of these groups had average concentrations that equate to substantial enrichment by modern standards; in half the groups this average concentration would be classified as “poor status” whilst the maximum concentrations in three groups equates to “bad status”.   Whatever way you look at it now, these sites were far from “unpolluted”.

Classification of TWINSPAN end-groups of unpolluted river sites in Great Britain based on Armitage et al. (1984) along with average and maximum phosphorus concentrations recorded in each group and the phosphorus status based on current environmental standards.  M = moderate status; P = poor status; B = bad status.

I am not being critical of the approach taken by Patrick Armitage and colleagues.  In many ways, I regard the work of this group as one of the most significant contributions to the science of ecological assessment in my lifetime.   I am just intrigued to see how the thinking of ecologists and regulators has moved on in the thirty years or so since this paper was published.  I know from my own early conversations with NRA biologists that inorganic nutrients were not perceived as a problem in rivers until the early 1990s.   It was probably the European Community’s Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive (UWWTD) that started to draw the attention of biologists in the UK to these problems, and which led to the development of stricter environmental standards for nutrients, though not without opposition from several quarters.

This, then is a situation where good legislation provided the impetus needed to start the process.  There were places in the UK – rivers in the Norfolk Broads, for example – where nutrients were already being regulated, but these were special circumstances and nutrient problems in most rivers were largely ignored. Indeed, as I said in my previous post, phosphorus was not even measured routinely in many rivers.   I heard via my professional grapevine that it was the Netherlands who had made the case for the clauses in the UWWTD concerning regulating nutrients, as their stretches of the lower Rhine were subject to numerous problems caused by unregulated inputs of nutrients from countries upstream.   I do not know if this is true, but it is certainly plausible.   However, once the need to control eutrophication in rivers was codified in UK law, then the debate about how to evaluate it started, one of the outcomes of which was more funding for me to develop the Trophic Diatom Index (referenced in the previous post).  And, gradually, over time, concentrations in rivers really did start to fall (see “The state of things, part 2”).   I’d like to think the TDI played a small part in this; though this might also mean that I am partially responsible for the steep increase in water charges that everyone endured in order to pay for better water quality …

Reference

Armitage, P.D., Moss, D., Wright, J.F. & Furse, M.T. (1984).  The performance of a new biological water quality score system based on macroinvertebrates over a wide range of unpolluted running-water sites.  Water Research 17: 333-347.

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